JAPANESE TOP Message from the Director Information Faculty list Research Projects International Conference Entrance Exam Visitors Publication Job Vacancy International Partnerships Links Access HANDBOOK FOR INTERNATIONAL RESEARCHERS Map of Inuyama
TOPICS
BONOBO Chimpanzee "Ai" Crania photos Itani Jun'ichiro archives Guidelines for Care and Use of Nonhuman Primates(pdf) Study material catalogue/database Guideline for field research of non-human primates Primate Genome DB

Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University
Inuyama, Aichi 484-8506, JAPAN
TEL. +81-568-63-0567
(Administrative Office)
FAX. +81-568-63-0085

Copyright (c)
Primate Research Institute,
Kyoto University All rights reserved.

Contact

Japanese

Defining the Geographical Range of the Plasmodium knowlesi Reservoir

Catherine L. Moyes, Andrew J. Henry, Nick Golding, Zhi Huang, Balbir Singh, J. Kevin Baird, Paul N. Newton, Michael Huffman, Kirsten A. Duda, Chris J. Drakeley, Iqbal R. F. Elyazar, Nicholas M. Anstey, Qijun Chen, Zinta Zommers, Samir Bhatt, Peter W. Gething, Simon I. Hay

Background: The simian malaria parasite, Plasmodium knowlesi, can cause severe and fatal disease in humans yet it is rarely included in routine public health reporting systems for malaria and its geographical range is largely unknown. Because malaria caused by P. knowlesi is a truly neglected tropical disease, there are substantial obstacles to defining the geographical extent and risk of this disease. Information is required on the occurrence of human cases in different locations, on which non-human primates host this parasite and on which vectors are able to transmit it to humans. We undertook a systematic review and ranked the existing evidence, at a sub-national spatial scale, to investigate the potential geographical range of the parasite reservoir capable of infecting humans. Methodology/Principal Findings: After reviewing the published literature we identified potential host and vector species and ranked these based on how informative they are for the presence of an infectious parasite reservoir, based on current evidence. We collated spatial data on parasite occurrence and the ranges of the identified host and vector species. The ranked spatial data allowed us to assign an evidence score to 475 sub-national areas in 19 countries and we present the results on a map of the Southeast and South Asia region. Conclusions/Significance: We have ranked subnational areas within the potential disease range according to evidence for presence of a disease risk to humans, providing geographical evidence to support decisions on prevention, management and prophylaxis. This work also highlights the unknown risk status of large parts of the region. Within this unknown category, our map identifies which areas have most evidence for the potential to support an infectious reservoir and are therefore a priority for further investigation. Furthermore we identify geographical areas where further investigation of putative host and vector species would be highly informative for the region-wide assessment.

PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 8(3): e2780. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0002780

MAR/31/2014

Copyright(C) 2012 PRI (). All rights reserved.